Lucas G. Pinheiro

Research Associate
Academic Appointments

Postdoctoral Fellow, Political Economy Project
Lecturer, Department of Government

My research bridges political theory and social history by focusing on the development of global capitalism, empire, and the legacies of racial slavery in the Atlantic world since the late seventeenth century. My current book project, Factories of Modernity: Political Thought in the Capitalist Epoch, recasts the factory system as a decisive stage for political thought and practice in the Atlantic world between 1688 and 1807. From this historical study, I develop a long-range conceptual framework for understanding modern capitalism and confronting its enduring patterns of growth, discipline, racialization, and inequality. My article, “A Factory Afield: Capitalism and Empire in John Locke’s Political Economy, is forthcoming in Modern Intellectual History. In the spring of 2022, I will organize a workshop series at the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society at the University of Chicago, titled Intellectual Histories of Global Capitalism. At Dartmouth, I will teach two seminars in political theory and political economy during the winter of 2022: “Theories of Racial Capitalism” and “The Rise of Capitalism.”

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Silsby 109
HB 6108
Department(s): 
Government
Education: 
Ph.D. University of Chicago
M.A. Univeristy of Chicago
M.Phil. University of Cambridge
B.A. University of British Columbia

Selected Publications

“A Factory Afield: Capitalism and Empire in John Locke’s Political Economy,” Modern Intellectual History (Forthcoming; online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1479244320000347).

 

“Review of Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism by Onur Ulas Ince (Oxford, 2018),” Contemporary Political Theory 20, no.3 (2021): 110-114; online: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41296-020-00412-6.

 

“The Ableist Contract: Intellectual Disability and the Limits of Justice in Kant’s Political Thought,” Disability and Political Theory, edited by Barbara Arneil and Nancy J. Hirschmann (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016): 43-78. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316694053.004.